Samuel Bisrat

"It soon became clear to me that I was that type of person who has to start something on his own in order to feel fulfilled"

Samuel Bisrat’s parents came to Germany from Eritrea and the Sudan in the late 70s to start a new life. Samuel was born and got his school education in Germany and now studies Sports Science in Frankfurt. Nonetheless, his parents’ culture and language has always been part of his life, as he grew up in a bilingual environment.

“My father has a degree in education” he tells us. “He has written textbooks for Eritrean children in Germany to help them to learn German better and easier.” In retrospect, he relates that, when he was a kid, he was very impressed by his father’s meticulous work and he was particularly inspired by the idea of creating something that could add value to the society by helping other people.

That’s why Samuel has been very busy with the idea of being self-employed during his schooling.

“It soon became clear to me that I was that type of person who has to start something on his own in order to feel fulfilled says the 25-year-old.

During his sports studies, he dedicated a lot of his attention to the theme exercise, health and prevention. He noticed that young children have been suffering from obesity and having deficits in movement sequences with a certain frequency nowadays. As a result, Samuel’s business idea was to make a healthier society and to help young children become enthusiastic about sports and a healthy lifestyle: He created his company, “Outdoor Kids”, which offers an outdoor sports program for children between 2 and 6 years, introducing them to sport and encouraging them to move.

Since 2017, his business runs successfully in Frankfurt and will soon be expanding to other German cities.

“In addition, I have many other ideas that I would like to place within this context. For example, healthy nutrition will soon become another building block of this concept, “ explains Samuel.

On the way to become a successful entrepreneur, Samuel did not only set up his own start-up, but also learned a lot about himself. As he thinks in retrospect, he believes that it was not the formalities that were difficult in the founding of the business, but the difficulties that were stemming from himself. “Especially with my family, who fled from the war, the safety aspect was always the highest priority,” he says. “We always avoided uncertainty. This is something that I absorbed since childhood and then carried along with me “. Therefore, he finally had to overcome himself in the final step into self-employment, leaving his comfort zone and embarking on the uncertainties and risks of a business founder. But all of that paid off and today he is “happier than ever”, says Samuel while he talks to his satisfied parents and enjoys watching the children in the program.

For all the young people who want to start a business, Samuel has a valuable advice: “Start as early as possible to get in touch with potential customers. Talk about your product, go out. This is the best way to succeed quickly and safely. “

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This website is part of the project Network for Migrant Entrepreneurs to Scale Up and Grow — EMEN-UP (no. 764398) which has received funding from the European Union’s COSME Programme (2014-2020)

The Network for Migrant Entrepreneurs to Scale Up and Grow

This website is part of the project Network for Migrant Entrepreneurs to Scale Up and Grow — EMEN-UP (no. 764398) which has received funding from the European Union’s COSME Programme (2014-2020)

The Network for Migrant Entrepreneurs to Scale Up and Grow

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